Southern     Counties    Schools    Judo

19 Rothwell's Close, Cholsey, Oxfordshire, OX10 9LE

Email: info@southerncountiesschoolsjudo.co.uk

Phone: 07950 299946

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COPYRIGHT© 2018 SOUTHERN COUNTIES SCHOOLS JUDO LTD

PRIVACY POLICY

Our

COACHES

KELLY HUTTON

Assistant coach

 

COACHES

STEVE HUTTON

Head coach

ASHLEY KNOX

Assistant coach

We are all DBS checked and are Safeguarding and First Aid trained.

 

History  of S.C.S.J.

Steve Hutton has been coaching Judo for over 20 years and running Southern Counties Schools Judo since 1999. He is a Level 3 British Judo Association coach and a British Judo Council coach.

 

 

Here at Southern Counties Schools Judo, we have children who have started with us aged 5 and go right through to black belt and attain their Dan grades. We’ve had success at a national level in the British Schools Championships with a number of medal winners and have also coached children who have gone on to represent Great Britain.

 

Playing Judo can help build your child's coordination, self-confidence and self-discipline. Classes are mixed for boys and girls, and we have all ages and abilities learning together. Come along and give it a try!

Judo is a martial art that was born in Japan, and it is now known around the world as an Olympic sport. Judo was established in 1882 by combining jujitsu, a form of wrestling, with mental discipline. The roots of jujitsu lie in sumo, which has a long, long history; sumo is mentioned in the Nihon shoki (Chronicle of Japan), a document from 720 that describes the history of Japan from the mythical age of the gods until the time of Empress Jito, who reigned from 686 to 697.

 

From the twelfth to the nineteenth century Japan was ruled by the samurai, a class of professional soldiers. This provided fertile ground for various martial arts to develop. In addition to fighting with swords and bows and arrows, the samurai developed jujitsu to fight enemies at close quarters on the battlefield. Several different styles of jujitsu evolved, and hand-to-hand combat spread as an important form of military training.

The era of samurai rule came to an end with the Meiji Restoration of 1868, and Western culture began filtering in into Japanese society. Jujitsu fell into decline, but the enthusiasm of one young man rescued it from extinction. That man was Jigoro Kano, the founder of judo as we know it today. Kano excelled in schoolwork but had an inferiority complex about his small physique. So he became an apprentice of Yanosuke Fukuda, a master of the Tenjin Shin'yo school of jujitsu, when he was 17 and worked to become stronger. In May 1882, when he was just 21 years old, he took the best things about each jujitsu style and created a single new school. This was the birth of modern judo. At first he had just nine students, and the dojo (practice hall) measured just 12 jo (about 24 square yards).

 

 

 

History  of Judo